sarah • 25 • usa

i adore quotes.

Concerto pour violon en mi mineur, Op. 64: III. Allegro non troppo – Allegro molto vivace . Mendelssohn-Bartholdy, Felix (1809–1847)

Violin Concerto in E minor, Op. 64: III. Allegro non troppo – Allegro molto vivace, Felix Mendelssohn; Yehudi Menuhin, Efrem Kurtz: Philharmonia Orchestra


"Because lying to your kids about sex helps nobody. Telling them that sex is “only between mommies and daddies” is a lie that leads to confused, hormone charged teenagers. Telling them that sex is ‘only something that happens when two people love each other very much’ is a lie that causes hormone charged teenagers to confuse ‘love’ with ‘lust,’ or ‘obsession.’ It leads to leaps of logic like, ‘If I have sex with them, we must be in love.’ Or worse- ‘If I love them, I have to have sex with them.’ And how many teenage tragedies are based on that misconception?
"The truth is human beings, almost universally, like sex. It feels good. It’s supposed to feel good. If it didn’t, the human race would die out. The truth is sex isn’t special and magical just because it’s sex. The truth is you can have spectacular sex with strangers who’s names you don’t even know. The truth is that just because you can, it doesn’t necessarily mean you should.
"And that’s what sex positive parenting really is. Not telling kids lies about sex to keep them from behaviors we don’t think are healthy. It’s telling them the truth, the whole truth, and letting it sink in so they can make their own good choices."
— Lea Grover (x)

"Because lying to your kids about sex helps nobody. Telling them that sex is “only between mommies and daddies” is a lie that leads to confused, hormone charged teenagers. Telling them that sex is ‘only something that happens when two people love each other very much’ is a lie that causes hormone charged teenagers to confuse ‘love’ with ‘lust,’ or ‘obsession.’ It leads to leaps of logic like, ‘If I have sex with them, we must be in love.’ Or worse- ‘If I love them, I have to have sex with them.’ And how many teenage tragedies are based on that misconception?

"The truth is human beings, almost universally, like sex. It feels good. It’s supposed to feel good. If it didn’t, the human race would die out. The truth is sex isn’t special and magical just because it’s sex. The truth is you can have spectacular sex with strangers who’s names you don’t even know. The truth is that just because you can, it doesn’t necessarily mean you should.

"And that’s what sex positive parenting really is. Not telling kids lies about sex to keep them from behaviors we don’t think are healthy. It’s telling them the truth, the whole truth, and letting it sink in so they can make their own good choices."

— Lea Grover (x)


"Well-written characters in geek properties will succeed with audiences regardless of gender, or color for that matter—women are far from the only group being marginalized by the geek mainstream. Female characters or characters of color may even do better when they represent something new and original. Maybe not that new and original, though. Like I said at the top, Buffy ended over 10 years ago. So then why does Orphan Black still feel so rare?”
— Joanna Robinson (x)

"Well-written characters in geek properties will succeed with audiences regardless of gender, or color for that matter—women are far from the only group being marginalized by the geek mainstream. Female characters or characters of color may even do better when they represent something new and original. Maybe not that new and original, though. Like I said at the top, Buffy ended over 10 years ago. So then why does Orphan Black still feel so rare?”

Joanna Robinson (x)


“If one meets a powerful person ask them five questions: ‘What power have you got? Where did you get it from? In whose interests do you exercise it? To whom are you accountable? And how can we get rid of you?’ If you cannot get rid of the people who govern you, you do not live in a democratic system.”
— Tony Benn

“If one meets a powerful person ask them five questions: ‘What power have you got? Where did you get it from? In whose interests do you exercise it? To whom are you accountable? And how can we get rid of you?’ If you cannot get rid of the people who govern you, you do not live in a democratic system.”

— Tony Benn

"The real spotlight needs to be on the poverty and environmental squalor in which epidemics thrive, and the failure of political leadership and public health systems to respond effectively. The international community has to be shamed into real commitment to the millennium goals for international development if the root causes of diseases like Ebola are to be addressed. And yes, as with the cholera in British cities in the 1840’s, the fact that the privileged were not exempt from being infected meant that enlightened self interest concentrated minds. In a shrinking world of long-haul flights, no reassurance by politicians can be copper-bottomed.
"So, what is to be done? There are already signs of increases in resources being made available, but if the experience of Aids is anything to go by, this may turn out to be smoke and mirrors, with funds being re-badged and failing to turn up on the ground. Photographs of the clinical conditions of health workers on social media this week have been truly shocking. We must respond to this emergency as if it was in Kensington, Chelsea, and Westminster. And we must ‘get real’ over economic development.
"We must also tackle the scandal of the unwillingness of the pharmaceutical industry to invest in research to produce treatments and vaccines, something they refuse to do because the numbers involved are, in their terms, so small and don’t justify the investment. This is the moral bankruptcy of capitalism acting in the absence of an ethical and social framework.
— John Ashton, CBE (x)

"The real spotlight needs to be on the poverty and environmental squalor in which epidemics thrive, and the failure of political leadership and public health systems to respond effectively. The international community has to be shamed into real commitment to the millennium goals for international development if the root causes of diseases like Ebola are to be addressed. And yes, as with the cholera in British cities in the 1840’s, the fact that the privileged were not exempt from being infected meant that enlightened self interest concentrated minds. In a shrinking world of long-haul flights, no reassurance by politicians can be copper-bottomed.

"So, what is to be done? There are already signs of increases in resources being made available, but if the experience of Aids is anything to go by, this may turn out to be smoke and mirrors, with funds being re-badged and failing to turn up on the ground. Photographs of the clinical conditions of health workers on social media this week have been truly shocking. We must respond to this emergency as if it was in Kensington, Chelsea, and Westminster. And we must ‘get real’ over economic development.

"We must also tackle the scandal of the unwillingness of the pharmaceutical industry to invest in research to produce treatments and vaccines, something they refuse to do because the numbers involved are, in their terms, so small and don’t justify the investment. This is the moral bankruptcy of capitalism acting in the absence of an ethical and social framework.

— John Ashton, CBE (x)

"Life is not what you alone make it. Life is the input of everyone who touched your life and every experience that entered it."
— Yuri Kochiyama (x)

"Life is not what you alone make it. Life is the input of everyone who touched your life and every experience that entered it."

Yuri Kochiyama (x)

Girls Chase Boys . Ingrid Michaelson

onechoicewilldefineyou:

I got two hands, one beating heart, 
And I’ll be alright


"Over these past few months, the worst Ebola outbreak in history has exposed the moral bankruptcy of our pharmaceutical development model. The fight for public health care in the United States and the allied fight against healthcare privatization elsewhere in the West has only ever been half the battle. The goal of such campaigns can only truly be met when a new campaign is mounted: to rebuild the international pharmaceutical industry as a public sector service as well as address wider neoliberal policies that indirectly undermine public health.
"We could take inspiration from HIV/AIDS activist groups from the late 80s/early 90s like ACT UP and the Treatment Action Group, and, in the 2000s, South Africa’s Treatment Action Campaign, which combined direct action and civil disobedience against both companies and politicians with a scientifically rigorous understanding of their condition.
"But this time, we need a larger, more comprehensive campaign covering not just one disease, but the panoply of market failures with respect to vaccine development, the antibiotic discovery void, neglected tropical diseases, and all neglected diseases of poverty. We need a science-based treatment activism that has the long-term, ambitious but achievable aim of the pharmaceutical industry’s democratic conquest.
"We need a campaign to destroy the unprofitable diseases."
—  Leigh Phillips (x)

"Over these past few months, the worst Ebola outbreak in history has exposed the moral bankruptcy of our pharmaceutical development model. The fight for public health care in the United States and the allied fight against healthcare privatization elsewhere in the West has only ever been half the battle. The goal of such campaigns can only truly be met when a new campaign is mounted: to rebuild the international pharmaceutical industry as a public sector service as well as address wider neoliberal policies that indirectly undermine public health.

"We could take inspiration from HIV/AIDS activist groups from the late 80s/early 90s like ACT UP and the Treatment Action Group, and, in the 2000s, South Africa’s Treatment Action Campaign, which combined direct action and civil disobedience against both companies and politicians with a scientifically rigorous understanding of their condition.

"But this time, we need a larger, more comprehensive campaign covering not just one disease, but the panoply of market failures with respect to vaccine development, the antibiotic discovery void, neglected tropical diseases, and all neglected diseases of poverty. We need a science-based treatment activism that has the long-term, ambitious but achievable aim of the pharmaceutical industry’s democratic conquest.

"We need a campaign to destroy the unprofitable diseases."

—  Leigh Phillips (x)


"We don’t know what police brutality looks like, statistically speaking. The federal government tries to keep numbers on excessive force. But that requires cooperation of thousands of law enforcement agencies around the country, and many are less forthcoming than others. There’s also the not-insignificant issue around what constitutes ‘excessive,’ which varies from jurisdiction to jurisdiction and even case to case. This also means we don’t know, exactly, how many people die in encounters with the police each year. It’s somewhere around a few hundred. That means it’s exceedingly rare, considering the millions and millions of arrests that happen each year. Some tiny fraction of a percent. 
Or. 
"You look at the 400 or so arrest-related deaths each year and you realize that that means that everyday someone is killed by police. And you consider that the likelihood of dying in an encounter with the police creeps up with each encounter with the police. And there are places in this country where encounters with the police are unavoidable, because cops are omnipresent.
"In 2011, there were 120,000 police stops of black/Latino boys between 14 and 18 in NYC. There were 170,000 black/Latino boys in NYC then. If you were a brown kid in NYC, you were very, very likely to have been stopped under stop and frisk (via). And there all sorts of disruptions that attend those stops. You spend 12 hours in a holding cell, get released without a charge… you may have had to be someplace very important and you have to explain that to your boss at Target or your school or whatever. And so certain populations are in near-constant contact with police, and at constant risk of police-related disruption of their lives. For those folks, Eric Garner and Michael Brown aren’t statistical anomalies, but worst-case scenarios for more quotidian privations.
"If your contact with the police is nothing like that—maybe a speeding ticket, but mostly respectful and rare, you’re going to have a different posture toward the police. And you wouldn’t be wrong to have that posture; you live in a materially different world. It’s not as simple as willful blindness. It’s like being a person without a disability who doesn’t know which subway stops have elevators. You don’t have to know that this is happening.
"Black people are intensely physically segregated in this country; white folks who don’t think police treat black unfairly don’t live near black people, as that Pew study points out. Urbanites are much more likely to say black folks are treated less fairly than white than were folks who lived in rural areas. 
"So: for some folks, the police are public servants, who serve and protect, who respond to calls for assistance, who de-escalate situations. And for others, they are agents of chaos; their presence introduces all sorts of scenarios including deadly force, into any scenario."
— Gene Demby (x)

"We don’t know what police brutality looks like, statistically speaking. The federal government tries to keep numbers on excessive force. But that requires cooperation of thousands of law enforcement agencies around the country, and many are less forthcoming than others. There’s also the not-insignificant issue around what constitutes ‘excessive,’ which varies from jurisdiction to jurisdiction and even case to case. This also means we don’t know, exactly, how many people die in encounters with the police each year. It’s somewhere around a few hundred. That means it’s exceedingly rare, considering the millions and millions of arrests that happen each year. Some tiny fraction of a percent. 

Or. 

"You look at the 400 or so arrest-related deaths each year and you realize that that means that everyday someone is killed by police. And you consider that the likelihood of dying in an encounter with the police creeps up with each encounter with the police. And there are places in this country where encounters with the police are unavoidable, because cops are omnipresent.

"In 2011, there were 120,000 police stops of black/Latino boys between 14 and 18 in NYC. There were 170,000 black/Latino boys in NYC then. If you were a brown kid in NYC, you were very, very likely to have been stopped under stop and frisk (via). And there all sorts of disruptions that attend those stops. You spend 12 hours in a holding cell, get released without a charge… you may have had to be someplace very important and you have to explain that to your boss at Target or your school or whatever. And so certain populations are in near-constant contact with police, and at constant risk of police-related disruption of their lives. For those folks, Eric Garner and Michael Brown aren’t statistical anomalies, but worst-case scenarios for more quotidian privations.

"If your contact with the police is nothing like that—maybe a speeding ticket, but mostly respectful and rare, you’re going to have a different posture toward the police. And you wouldn’t be wrong to have that posture; you live in a materially different world. It’s not as simple as willful blindness. It’s like being a person without a disability who doesn’t know which subway stops have elevators. You don’t have to know that this is happening.

"Black people are intensely physically segregated in this country; white folks who don’t think police treat black unfairly don’t live near black people, as that Pew study points out. Urbanites are much more likely to say black folks are treated less fairly than white than were folks who lived in rural areas. 

"So: for some folks, the police are public servants, who serve and protect, who respond to calls for assistance, who de-escalate situations. And for others, they are agents of chaos; their presence introduces all sorts of scenarios including deadly force, into any scenario."

— Gene Demby (x)

"Another young black man has been gunned down. His name was Mike Brown. He was unarmed.
"My [redacted] e-mailed me because she knew I would be upset about this story, because she knows all of my heart, and all I could say in response was, ‘I am numb.’
"I don’t care if Mike Brown was going to college soon. This should not matter. We should not have to prove Mike Brown was worthy of living. We should not have to account for the ways in which he is suitably respectable. We should not have to prove that his body did not deserve to be riddled with bullets. His community should not have to silence their anger so they won’t be accused of rioting, so they won’t become targets too.
"It should not matter if Mike Brown was a good boy but I have no doubt that he was. His life mattered, no matter how he chose to live it. He had family and friends who must mourn him and who must now worry about who will be murdered next. Every life matters. There are few things I believe more passionately. Unfortunately, we live in a country where your worth and safety are largely determined by the color of your skin." 
Roxane Gay, Ph.D. (x) 

"Another young black man has been gunned down. His name was Mike Brown. He was unarmed.

"My [redacted] e-mailed me because she knew I would be upset about this story, because she knows all of my heart, and all I could say in response was, ‘I am numb.’

"I don’t care if Mike Brown was going to college soon. This should not matter. We should not have to prove Mike Brown was worthy of living. We should not have to account for the ways in which he is suitably respectable. We should not have to prove that his body did not deserve to be riddled with bullets. His community should not have to silence their anger so they won’t be accused of rioting, so they won’t become targets too.

"It should not matter if Mike Brown was a good boy but I have no doubt that he was. His life mattered, no matter how he chose to live it. He had family and friends who must mourn him and who must now worry about who will be murdered next. Every life matters. There are few things I believe more passionately. Unfortunately, we live in a country where your worth and safety are largely determined by the color of your skin." 

Roxane Gay, Ph.D. (x) 


"Imagine if you take a region of Canada, America, Europe and you had 450 people dying of a viral hemorrhagic fever. It would just be unacceptable — and it’s unacceptable in West Africa.
"…We moved heaven and earth to help a German lab technician. Why is it different because this is West Africa?"
—  Jeremy Farrar, MBBS, DPhil, FRCP, OBE  (x) (x)

"Imagine if you take a region of Canada, America, Europe and you had 450 people dying of a viral hemorrhagic fever. It would just be unacceptable — and it’s unacceptable in West Africa.

"…We moved heaven and earth to help a German lab technician. Why is it different because this is West Africa?"

—  Jeremy Farrar, MBBS, DPhil, FRCP, OBE  (x) (x)
a quick life update:

what with packing, firmly tying up loose ends, moving to a new state, and general preparation for my graduate program, i’m going on hiatus for a little bit. i will miss you all dearly but i promise i’ll be back shortly.

hopefully i’ll see all you lovely people in a week!


“‘But there are two sides!’ Yes, occupier and occupied. Oppressor and oppressed. Those implementing a system of domination and those forced to live under it.”
— Remi Kanazi (x)

“‘But there are two sides!’ Yes, occupier and occupied. Oppressor and oppressed. Those implementing a system of domination and those forced to live under it.”

Remi Kanazi (x)


"So sick watching our Secretary of State have to grovel so hard to tell Israel how much he loves them while Israeli cabinet shits on him."
— John Legend (x) (x)

"So sick watching our Secretary of State have to grovel so hard to tell Israel how much he loves them while Israeli cabinet shits on him."

John Legend (x) (x)


“Benjamin Netanyahu is a war criminal — not because he’s Jewish, but because he has chosen to promote occupation and annhilation. This is a human affair.
“…There’s an intimate connection between mendacity and criminality, between lies and crimes against humanity. And what I want to say to my Black brother in the White House: Barack Obama is a war criminal, not because he’s Black, or half-African and white, because his drones have killed 233 innocent children, and because he facilitates the killing of innocent Palestinians in Gaza and the West Bank, and it would be true anywhere else."…The killing of any innocent civilian is a war crime. But we’re now [at] 1,600 and counting. That is Israeli state terrorism in action.”
— Cornel West, Ph.D. (x) (x) (x)

“Benjamin Netanyahu is a war criminal — not because he’s Jewish, but because he has chosen to promote occupation and annhilation. This is a human affair.

“…There’s an intimate connection between mendacity and criminality, between lies and crimes against humanity. And what I want to say to my Black brother in the White House: Barack Obama is a war criminal, not because he’s Black, or half-African and white, because his drones have killed 233 innocent children, and because he facilitates the killing of innocent Palestinians in Gaza and the West Bank, and it would be true anywhere else.

"…The killing of any innocent civilian is a war crime. But we’re now [at] 1,600 and counting. That is Israeli state terrorism in action.”

Cornel West, Ph.D. (x) (x) (x)

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